Ticket Center Stage

The Barber of Seville


Sunday, March 4, 2018 3:00PM
Mead Theatre - Schuster Center

The Barber of Seville





Choose from the list below to jump directly to another offering of

The Barber of Seville


Music by GIOACHINO ROSSINI
Libretto by CESARE STERBINI

CLINTON SMITH* conductor
KATHLEEN CLAWSON stage director
JARRETT OTT* baritone – Figaro
ALYSSA MARTIN* mezzo-soprano – Rosina
CARLOS ENRIQUE SANTELLI* tenor – Almaviva
THOMAS HAMMONS bass-baritone – Bartolo
HAROLD WILSON bass – Basilio
NORAGH DEVLIN* mezzo-soprano – Berta
ALEXANDER HARPER baritone – Fiorello
MICHAEL ANDERSON* tenor – Sergeant

*Dayton Opera debut

DAYTON OPERA THOMAS BANKSTON artistic director
DAYTON OPERA CHORUS JEFFREY POWELL chorus master
DAYTON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

IN ITALIAN WITH ENGLISH SURTITLES

“Figaro! Figaro! FI-GA-RO!” Mischief and matchmaking run rampant when opera’s most famous barber returns to Dayton. Figaro not only cuts hair but is also a schemer and a matchmaker like no other. When the ardent young Count Almaviva needs a hand wooing high-spirited Rosina, he turns to Figaro to help him outwit Rosina's selfish old guardian, Dr. Bartolo. Buoyed by Rossini’s bubbling music, this zany romance sweeps you along through unexpected twists and turns until an ending that leaves everyone happy. You’ll be smiling, too!

After a famously disastrous opening night that left the composer in tears, The Barber of Seville has gone on to become the most famous comic opera ever written. It’s impossible to resist Rossini’s sparkling score combined with his unforgettable characters—irrepressible Figaro, love-smitten Almaviva, sly Rosina, crotchety Dr. Bartolo, and Don Basilio, Rosina’s pretentious windbag of a voice teacher.

Along the way you’ll hear a gem of the baritone repertoire when Figaro introduces himself in one of the jolliest, trickiest arias ever, “Largo al factotum,” known to most by its memorable “Figaro, Figaro, Figaro!” interjection. Whether you’re an opera lover or a newbie, The Barber of Seville will lift your spirits. It’s also a great starter opera for your children, who probably know some of it from Bugs Bunny’s "Rabbit of Seville" cartoon.